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Shear-ling

Mark S. Bernhardt, MD
Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(5):630. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.94.
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When I took over my current practice in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, 20 years ago, I inherited a whole lot of surgical instruments that have been gathering dust ever since. While I was making another creature using some of these tools of the trade (to be published in a later edition of the Archives), I envisioned using the handles from assorted hemostats, clamps, forceps, and scissors to make a creature. In honor of all the scissors that I sacrificed to create this objet d’art, I call this little lamb Shear-ling (Figure). The legs are needle holders, and the fur is made up of the aforementioned handles. The body's undersurface consists of 2 desk organizers (like you use for pencils and paper clips) that had the necessary perforations for stitching the wires to hold everything together. (One day I really should learn how to weld.) The nose I covered with a spare stainless steel cup because I thought it looked nicer. Unlike many of my fellow dermatologists, I’m not that into cosmetic work, but maybe this qualifies as a nose job.

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Shear-ling: legs, needle holders; fur, handles from assorted hemostats, clamps, forceps, and scissors.

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