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Notable Notes |

Articles of Faith

Mark Bernhardt, MD
Arch Dermatol. 2010;146(5):550. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2010.17.
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This beast was made out of the odds and ends that folk medicine and traditional healers might use to treat warts. The torso is the notorious duct tape, the head a raw potato, and the rump a banana peel. Onions for eyes, garlic cloves for ears, and a cashew for the mouth complete the body of the “Articles of Faith.” Apple cider vinegar legs are standing on a stolen dishrag (sorry about that Debby, but it's for my ART!). A very scary necklace is made with the following “charms”: a copper penny, a wedding band, a dead chicken's head and feet, and a bone. Most all of these remedies just need to be rubbed on the wart, except for the tape and the peel, which are put on and left on (the latter should be applied with the inner side toward the wart). You can use them individually or in combination: apple cider vinegar apparently goes well with both duct tape and banana peel. The efficacy of the penny treatment might be enhanced if you subsequently bury the penny under a porch. I do not know whether a patio or a deck can be substituted. Similarly, if the dishrag is buried on someone else's property, that person will then also acquire the wart! I therefore cannot recommend this treatment since it is not nice either to steal another's dishrag or to trespass with the intent of giving somebody a wart.

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The “Articles of Faith.”

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