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Editorial |

Online Reviews of Physicians Valuable Feedback, Valuable Advertising

Dane Hill, MD1; Steven R. Feldman, MD, PhD1,2,3
[+] Author Affiliations
1The Center for Dermatology Research, Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
2Department of Pathology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
3Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
JAMA Dermatol. 2016;152(2):143-144. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2015.3951.
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This is the best time to be alive in human history. Technology has objectively improved our lives in countless ways. In dermatology, this is perhaps best exemplified by the treatments we now have for psoriasis. Just a few years ago, we would have been ecstatic for a cyclosporine-like drug that did not cause renal adverse effects, but now we have biologic drugs that are far safer and more effective than we would have dreamed of.

Electronics have revolutionized our lives. Smart phones give us entire libraries at our fingertips, searchable by voice command; the ability to communicate on the spot with our family, friends, and medical colleagues; and countless other ways to spend our time, productively or otherwise. We have medical technologies that can peer inside the body completely unobtrusively, and we have medical record systems that remind us of needed screenings, warn us of potential harmful interactions, and, for better and worse, put the entire medical record of a patient’s care at our disposal.

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The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
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