0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
Research Letter |

Indoor Tanning Devices in Student Apartment Complexes A Study of 2 Texas University Communities FREE

Diana Bartenstein, AB1; Dayna Diven, MD2 ; James Allred, MD2 ; Kellie Reed, MD2
[+] Author Affiliations
1Medical student, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
2 Dermatology Program, The University of Texas Dell Medical School, Austin
JAMA Dermatol. 2015;151(8):905-906. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2015.1189.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Indoor tanning increases the risk for melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer.1,2 It is popular among college students; researchers estimate that 43% of university students had used indoor tanning in the prior year.3 A recent study of 125 US universities found that nearly half had indoor tanning available on campus or at apartments near campus, 96% of which offered indoor tanning without charge.4 We investigated the prevalence of apartments offering on-site free tanning as well as adherence to Texas state law prohibitions against indoor tanning for minors at The University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin) and Texas A&M University (TAMU). Specifically, we assessed compliance with the Texas Administrative Code that outlaws the use of indoor tanning devices by minors.5

We used the websites google.com, apartmentguide.com, collegestudentapartments.com, and daftlogic.com to find apartments within a 5-mile radius of the center of both campuses. From June 17, 2014, through July 30, 2014, one of us (D.B.) called each apartment to ascertain the approximate number of residents in the building who were students, whether free indoor tanning was offered, and whether indoor tanning for minors was allowed. This was not considered human subjects research, and the Institutional Review Board of the Office of Research Facilitation, Seton Family of Healthcare waived the requirement for approval.

Fifty percent (12 of 24) of apartments within 1 mile of UT Austin and 31% (22 of 72) within a 2-mile radius of TAMU offer free on-site indoor tanning. Within a 5-mile radius, more than 11 500 renters near UT Austin and 17 500 renters near TAMU have access to free indoor tanning on site. Most of these locations were apartments with predominantly undergraduate and graduate students. Of these apartments, 18% (3 of 17) and 32% (8 of 25) near UT and TAMU, respectively, of personnel answered that no consent was needed for a 17-year-old to use the tanning facilities and 53% (9 of 17) and 48% (12 of 25), respectively, answered that minors were allowed to use the tanning facilities with parental consent. Only 1 of 17 and 1 of 25 apartment personnel at UT and TAMU, respectively, knew that use of indoor tanning facilities was prohibited for minors.

Dermatologists have been effective in calling attention to the dangers of tanning salons for noncompliance with state and federal legislation.6 Our investigation suggests that noncompliance is also problematic when apartment buildings have indoor tanning beds and booths operated by office staff whose primary job is not monitoring these devices. The majority of employees that we questioned did not adhere to the Texas state regulation banning access to indoor tanning facilities to minors. This phenomenon of free on-site tanning in apartment buildings is substantial—more than 29 000 renters in close proximity to UT Austin and TAMU campuses have such access. When students go to college they are exposed to a plethora of risk behaviors. We can now add indoor tanning to this list.

Accepted for Publication: March 30, 2015.

Corresponding Author: Diana Bartenstein, AB, 46 Sanderson Rd, Lexington, MA 02420 (diana.bartenstein@gmail.com).

Published Online: June 3, 2015. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2015.1189.

Author Contributions: Ms Bartenstein and Dr Allred had full access to all the data in the study and take responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis.

Study concept and design: Diven, Allred, Reed.

Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: Bartenstein, Diven, Reed.

Drafting of the manuscript: Bartenstein, Diven, Allred.

Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: Bartenstein, Diven, Reed.

Statistical analysis: Bartenstein, Reed.

Administrative, technical, or material support: Reed.

Study supervision: Diven, Reed.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

Previous Presentation: This research was presented at the Texas Dermatological Society 2014 Annual Fall Meeting; October 24-25, 2014; Bastrop, Texas.

Boniol  M, Autier  P, Boyle  P, Gandini  S.  Cutaneous melanoma attributable to sunbed use: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ. 2012;345:e4757.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Wehner  MR, Shive  ML, Chren  MM, Han  J, Qureshi  AA, Linos  E.  Indoor tanning and non-melanoma skin cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ. 2012;345:e5909.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Wehner  MR, Chren  MM, Nameth  D,  et al.  International prevalence of indoor tanning: a systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA Dermatol. 2014;150(4):390-400.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Pagoto  SL, Lemon  SC, Oleski  JL,  et al.  Availability of taning beds on US college campuses. JAMA Dermatol. 2015;151(1):59-63.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Texas Department of State Health Services. Tanning Facility Updates. https://www.dshs.state.tx.us/dmd/tanning.shtm. Accessed August 16, 2014.
Forster  JL, Lazovich  D, Hickle  A, Sorensen  G, Demierre  MF.  Compliance with restrictions on sale of indoor tanning sessions to youth in Minnesota and Massachusetts. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2006;55(6):962-967.
PubMed   |  Link to Article

Figures

Tables

References

Boniol  M, Autier  P, Boyle  P, Gandini  S.  Cutaneous melanoma attributable to sunbed use: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ. 2012;345:e4757.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Wehner  MR, Shive  ML, Chren  MM, Han  J, Qureshi  AA, Linos  E.  Indoor tanning and non-melanoma skin cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ. 2012;345:e5909.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Wehner  MR, Chren  MM, Nameth  D,  et al.  International prevalence of indoor tanning: a systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA Dermatol. 2014;150(4):390-400.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Pagoto  SL, Lemon  SC, Oleski  JL,  et al.  Availability of taning beds on US college campuses. JAMA Dermatol. 2015;151(1):59-63.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Texas Department of State Health Services. Tanning Facility Updates. https://www.dshs.state.tx.us/dmd/tanning.shtm. Accessed August 16, 2014.
Forster  JL, Lazovich  D, Hickle  A, Sorensen  G, Demierre  MF.  Compliance with restrictions on sale of indoor tanning sessions to youth in Minnesota and Massachusetts. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2006;55(6):962-967.
PubMed   |  Link to Article

Correspondence

CME
Also Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
Please click the checkbox indicating that you have read the full article in order to submit your answers.
Your answers have been saved for later.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

409 Views
1 Citations
×

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Articles Related By Topic
Related Collections
PubMed Articles
Jobs