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Editorial |

Introducing the Clinical Evidence Synopsis Section FREE

June K. Robinson, MD1,2; Jeffrey P. Callen, MD3,4
[+] Author Affiliations
1Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois
2editor, JAMA Dermatology
3Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky
4associate editor, JAMA Dermatology
JAMA Dermatol. 2015;151(2):127. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2014.1924.
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Harmonization of types of articles across the 10 journals of The JAMA Network provides an opportunity for JAMA Dermatology to adopt formats that were very well received by readers of other journals. JAMA led the development of the clinical evidence synopsis with the intention of providing a clinically relevant brief review of evidence-based guidelines and systematic reviews. The extensive evidence-based reviews done by organizations such as the Cochrane Collaboration, the US Preventive Services Task Force, and US National Institutes of Health Consensus Conferences will be searched for topics relevant to practicing dermatologists. The authors of the original review are invited to submit a 2-page synopsis. The Clinical Evidence Synopsis section will be published 4 times a year. In this issue, we present the first article, “Topical anti-inflammatory agents for seborrheic dermatitis of the face or scalp.”1

April W. Armstrong, MD, MPH, leads the Clinical Evidence Synopsis section. Dr Armstrong will be assisted by Daihung Do, MD, and Victoria R. Sharon, MD, DTMH. The focus of the editors is to frame the findings of the organization performing the review in ways that are relevant to practicing dermatologists and their patients. This section joins the Practice Gap section in interpreting and informing our readers about the evolution of knowledge and best practices recommendations in ways that will improve the care of our patients.

Please let us know if we fulfill our mission and suggest evidence-based reviews for the consideration of the editorial team of the Clinical Evidence Synopsis section.

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April W. Armstrong, MD, MPH

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Daihung Do, MD

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Victoria R. Sharon, MD, DTMH

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Corresponding Author: June K. Robinson, MD, Editor, JAMA Dermatology, Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 132 E Delaware Pl, Ste 5806, Chicago, IL 60611 (june.robinson@jamanetwork.org).

Published Online: January 28, 2015. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2014.1924.

REFERENCES

Kastarinen  H, Okokon  EO, Verbeek  JH.  Topical anti-inflammatory agents for seborrheic dermatitis of the face or scalp: summary of a Cochrane Review [published online January 28, 2015]. JAMA Dermatol. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2014.3186.

Figures

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April W. Armstrong, MD, MPH

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Daihung Do, MD

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Victoria R. Sharon, MD, DTMH

Tables

References

Kastarinen  H, Okokon  EO, Verbeek  JH.  Topical anti-inflammatory agents for seborrheic dermatitis of the face or scalp: summary of a Cochrane Review [published online January 28, 2015]. JAMA Dermatol. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2014.3186.

Correspondence

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