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Paraneoplastic Autoimmune Multiorgan Syndrome in a Patient With Li Fraumeni Syndrome FREE

Susan Margaret O'Gorman, MB BCh BAO1; Rochelle Torgerson, MD, PhD, FAAD2
[+] Author Affiliations
1Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
2Division of Clinical Dermatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
JAMA Dermatol. 2013;149(9):1116-1117. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2013.4982.
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Published online

Treatment of paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome (PAMS) can be challenging; a p53 tumor suppressor mutation adds a further layer of complexity.

REPORT OF A CASE

A 30-year-old African American woman with Li-Fraumeni syndrome was evaluated for a 4-month history of oral ulcerations. Her history was significant for adrenal carcinoma at age 3 years, undifferentiated leukemia at age 12 years, and breast cancer at age 18 years. Her oral ulcerations were painful causing difficulty eating and weight loss. Previous treatment with prednisone, 20 mg/d, provided limited relief.

On examination she had ulcerations affecting her labial, gingival, lingual, and buccal mucosae with no involvement of the skin or conjunctiva (Figure, A).

Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure.
Photographic Images From the Subject Case

A, Severe mucosal ulceration at initial presentation. B, Lichenoid mucositis, left buccal mucosa, bandlike lymphocytic inflammation at the mucosal-submucosal junction, basal vacuolar degeneration, and pigment incontinence (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×20).

Graphic Jump Location

A biopsy from her buccal mucosa showed lichenoid mucositis (Figure, B). Direct immunofluorescence findings were negative. Immunoprecipitation assay results for bullous pemphigoid antigens 180 and 230 were negative. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay findings for desmoglein 3 were negative, and the desmoglein 1 level was mildly elevated at 22 U (reference range, <14 U). On indirect immunofluorescence testing, salt-split skin showed cell surface staining consistent with pemphigus, and the monkey esophagus test result was negative. Further testing on rat bladder was not done owing to timely radiologic results.

The clinical features raised concern for paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome (PAMS). A computed tomographic scan of her chest, abdomen, and pelvis was performed in search of an occult malignant neoplasm. The scan revealed an anterior mediastinal mass, which, on excision, was determined to be an invasive thymoma. No other organ involvement was identified.

She began treatment with prednisone, 60 mg/d, and showed improvement. Subsequently, cyclosporine, 100 mg/d (1.25 mg/kg), was added to her regimen. Excision of her thymoma did not improve control. Over the next year her prednisone dose was tapered to eventual discontinuation, and she continued taking cyclosporine as monotherapy. She improved substantially, although her response was not complete.

DISCUSSION

Paraneoplastic pemphigus was coined over 20 years ago by Anhalt et al1 to describe an autoimmune blistering disorder in the setting of a malignant or benign neoplasm. More recently the term PAMS has come into use, in recognition of the polymorphous nature of this multiple-organ condition.2 Diagnosis rests on clinical, histopathologic, and immunologic criteria, and these have been suggested by Czernik et al.2 PAMS is a heterogeneous condition mediated by either a predominantly autoantibody or cell-mediated cytotoxic (CMC) effect. The predominance of a CMC mechanism is associated with the lichenoid variant.2,3 The best outcomes are seen in cases where the underlying malignant neoplasm is fully resectable, with resection leading to improvement in 15 of 20 patients in one series.4 Unfortunately, our patient did not demonstrate this.

Glucocorticoids form the backbone of therapy, with additional immunosuppressive agents being required in most cases. Options for additional immunosuppressive therapy include cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, cyclophosphamide, intravenous immunoglobulin, plasmapheresis, and rituximab.2,3,5 It has been proposed that many of these adjuvant immunosuppressants increase the risk of developing a malignant neoplasm. While this potential increase in risk may be acceptable in a patient at average risk, in the present case, it added a layer of complexity in our patient with a p53 mutation. We opted to use cyclosporine as a steroid-sparing agent, and our patient subsequently continued taking cyclosporine as monotherapy with a good response.

To our knowledge, this is the first reported case in English of treatment for PAMS in the setting of Li-Fraumeni syndrome. We recommend that an oncologist be involved in the choice of therapeutic agents for the treatment of PAMS in the setting of a p53 mutation.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Corresponding Author: Susan Margaret O'Gorman, MB BCh BAO, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (susanmogorman@gmail.com).

Published Online: July 31, 2013. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2013.4982.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

Additional Contributions: We are indebted to Alina G. Bridges, DO, for her help with histopathological findings in this case.

REFERENCES

Anhalt  GJ, Kim  SC, Stanley  JR,  et al.  Paraneoplastic pemphigus: an autoimmune mucocutaneous disease associated with neoplasia. N Engl J Med. 1990;323(25):1729-1735.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Czernik  A, Camilleri  M, Pittelkow  MR, Grando  SA.  Paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome: 20 years after. Int J Dermatol. 2011;50(8):905-914.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Cummins  DL, Mimouni  D, Tzu  J, Owens  N, Anhalt  GJ, Meyerle  JH.  Lichenoid paraneoplastic pemphigus in the absence of detectable antibodies. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2007;56(1):153-159.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Zhang  J, Qiao  QL, Chen  XX,  et al.  Improved outcomes after complete resection of underlying tumors for patients with paraneoplastic pemphigus: a single-center experience of 22 cases. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol. 2011;137(2):229-234.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Nguyen  VT, Ndoye  A, Bassler  KD,  et al.  Classification, clinical manifestations, and immunopathological mechanisms of the epithelial variant of paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome: a reappraisal of paraneoplastic pemphigus. Arch Dermatol. 2001;137(2):193-206.
PubMed

Figures

Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure.
Photographic Images From the Subject Case

A, Severe mucosal ulceration at initial presentation. B, Lichenoid mucositis, left buccal mucosa, bandlike lymphocytic inflammation at the mucosal-submucosal junction, basal vacuolar degeneration, and pigment incontinence (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×20).

Graphic Jump Location

Tables

References

Anhalt  GJ, Kim  SC, Stanley  JR,  et al.  Paraneoplastic pemphigus: an autoimmune mucocutaneous disease associated with neoplasia. N Engl J Med. 1990;323(25):1729-1735.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Czernik  A, Camilleri  M, Pittelkow  MR, Grando  SA.  Paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome: 20 years after. Int J Dermatol. 2011;50(8):905-914.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Cummins  DL, Mimouni  D, Tzu  J, Owens  N, Anhalt  GJ, Meyerle  JH.  Lichenoid paraneoplastic pemphigus in the absence of detectable antibodies. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2007;56(1):153-159.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Zhang  J, Qiao  QL, Chen  XX,  et al.  Improved outcomes after complete resection of underlying tumors for patients with paraneoplastic pemphigus: a single-center experience of 22 cases. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol. 2011;137(2):229-234.
PubMed   |  Link to Article
Nguyen  VT, Ndoye  A, Bassler  KD,  et al.  Classification, clinical manifestations, and immunopathological mechanisms of the epithelial variant of paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome: a reappraisal of paraneoplastic pemphigus. Arch Dermatol. 2001;137(2):193-206.
PubMed

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