0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
In This Issue of JAMA Dermatology |

In This Issue of JAMA Dermatology FREE

JAMA Dermatol. 2013;149(6):659. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2013.20.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP STUDY OF INGENOL MEBUTATE GEL FOR THE TREATMENT OF ACTINIC KERATOSES

Actinic keratoses are common in light-skinned individuals who spend significant time in geographic areas with moderate to high levels of solar radiation. Cryotherapy is the most widely used therapy for these premalignant lesions. Field therapies that treat the entire field of sun-damaged skin include fluorouracil, imiquimod, diclofenac, and photodynamic therapy. In this study, Lebwohl et al demonstrate that ingenol mebutate, the active ingredient in the sap of the plant Euphorbia peplus applied as a gel for 2 or 3 consecutive days was well tolerated and produced clinically relevant sustained clearance and long-term reduction in actinic keratoses.

See Article

PREVENTION OF SCAR SPREAD ON TRUNK EXCISIONS

The aesthetic outcome of a scar after surgery has been shown to be the most important predictor of a patient's overall assessment of skin cancer treatment. A higher level of patient dissatisfaction has been noted with wounds on the trunk compared with the face, often because of scar widening. In this prospective, randomized, controlled trial, Kia et al demonstrate that an intradermal suture material with a prolonged lifetime led to significantly decreased scar spread but an increased rate of noted suture reaction at 3 months. These data suggest that further studies into less reactive, longer-acting biomaterials are needed.

See Article

IMPROVING MANAGEMENT AND PATIENT CARE IN LENTIGO MALIGNA BY MAPPING WITH IN VIVO CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY

Lentigo maligna (LM) presents clinical, pathologic, and therapeutic challenges and a higher risk of local recurrence than other types of melanoma and common localization on cosmetically sensitive areas of the head and neck. In this case series of patients with LM and LM melanoma, Guitera et al demonstrate that in vivo confocal microscopy is a noninvasive imaging technique that can aid in mapping difficult lesions. This technique can guide overall case management and assist multidisciplinary medical teams in their management of these difficult cases.

See Article

SECONDARY HYPERPIGMENTATION DURING INTERFERON ALFA TREATMENT FOR CHRONIC HEPATITIS C VIRUS INFECTION

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global health problem, and pegylated interferon alfa-2b with ribavirin is the treatment of choice. Dermatologic manifestations of HCV infection include lichen planus, porphyria cutanea tarda, and vasculitis, but dermatologic adverse effects of HCV treatment have also been reported. In this prospective, descriptive clinical trial, Tsilika et al determined that secondary hyperpigmentation during interferon alfa treatment occurs as an adverse event in 21% of patients, especially in those with skin type III or IV who have unprotected sun exposure.

See Article

FINASTERIDE FOR THE TREATMENT OF HIDRADENITIS SUPPURATIVA IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory disease presenting with tender subcutaneous nodules and dermal abscesses in the axillae, groin, and anogenital regions. Onset typically occurs in the second or third decade of life. Anti-androgenic medications are among those used to treat HS, and in this case series, Randhawa et al demonstrate the therapeutic benefit of finasteride in pediatric patients with HS. Further prospective and randomized controlled trials will offer additional information about the use of finasteride for HS.

See Article

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

Tables

References

Correspondence

CME
Also Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
Please click the checkbox indicating that you have read the full article in order to submit your answers.
Your answers have been saved for later.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

573 Views
0 Citations
×

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Jobs