0
This Month in Archives of Dermatology |

This Month in Archives of Dermatology FREE

Arch Dermatol. 2012;148(11):1236. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2011.559.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

ASSOCIATION BETWEEN TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR INHIBITOR THERAPY AND MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION RISK IN PATIENTS WITH PSORIASIS

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory state associated with cutaneous manifestations as well as increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The effect of systemic treatment for psoriasis on cardiovascular disease has been largely unexplored. In this retrospective cohort study, Wu et al demonstrate that the use of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors for psoriasis was associated with a significant reduction in myocardial infarction (MI) risk and incident rate compared with topical agents. Treatment with these agents for psoriasis was associated with a lower MI rate than treatment with oral agents or phototherapy, although the difference did not reach statistical significance.

See Article

HIGH PREVALENCE OF STUMP DERMATOSES 38 YEARS OR MORE AFTER AMPUTATION

Two million patients who have undergone amputation reside in the United States alone, yet the prevalence of skin conditions they experience is underappreciated. In this cross-sectional health questionnaire of Vietnam War veterans, Yang et al describe a high prevalence of stump dermatoses at least 38 years after major limb amputation. Frictional and mechanical trauma to the stump skin caused by the prosthesis is believed to cause most of the stump dermatoses, and there is limited natural adaptation to these prostheses over time. These data demonstrate the need for further research in resolving the challenges of customization, fit, and comfort of prostheses for amputees.

See Article

EXPERIENCE WITH MOLLUSCUM CONTAGIOSUM AND ASSOCIATED INFLAMMATORY REACTIONS IN A PEDIATRIC DERMATOLOGY PRACTICE

Molluscum contagiosum (MC) is a self-limited viral skin infection that typically presents as umbilicated papules in children that spontaneously resolve in a few months to years. In this retrospective medical chart review, Berger et al demonstrate that several types of inflammatory reactions commonly occur with MC: lesions may become inflamed and surrounded by eczematous dermatitis, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome–like reactions (GCLRs) can occur. Treatment of the molluscum dermatitis can reduce spread of MC via autoinoculation, whereas inflamed MC lesions and GCLRs reflect cell-mediated immune responses that may lead to viral clearance.

See Article

RAPID HEALING OF SCAR-ASSOCIATED CHRONIC WOUNDS AFTER ABLATIVE FRACTIONAL RESURFACING

Skin compromised by traumatic scarring and split-thickness skin graft placement is often fragile. Scar contractures increase skin tension and decrease mobility, contributing to chronic erosions and ulcerations. These issues may impede rehabilitation after traumatic injuries by limiting prosthetic use, increasing pain, and increasing the risk of infection. In this case series, Shumaker et al describe patients with traumatic scars related to blast injury, complicated by skin fragility, sensitivity, contractures, and nonhealing areas. The sites were treated with a course of ablative fractional laser therapy, and healing was associated with gradual enhancements in scar pliability, texture, durability, and range of motion.

See Article

NEUTROPHILIC AND EOSINOPHILIC DERMATITIS CAUSED BY CONTACT ALLERGIC REACTION TO PARAPHENYLENEDIAMINE IN HAIR DYE

The potent sensitizer paraphenylenediamine (PPD) is often found in permanent hair dyes. Contact allergy to hair dyes is common among hairdressers and consumers, and the acute-stage lesions histologically resemble any eczematous reaction with marked spongiosis. In this case report, Lönngren et al describe a patient with scalp dermatitis and widespread skin lesions as well as lymphadenopathy and dyspnea resembling asthma after dying her hair. Biopsy specimens revealed a neutrophilic cellulitis and eosinophilic granulocytes. Patch testing produced a 3+ reaction to PPD, and biopsy specimens from the patch test site revealed these same unusual histologic features.

See Article

First Page Preview

View Large
/>
First page PDF preview

Tables

References

Correspondence

CME
Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).
Submit a Comment

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.